ARCENCPostings

Monday, October 16, 2017

The Abydos Temple Paper Archive, talk tomorrow, Oct. 17, 4 p.m., NES Lounge, UC Berkeley

The Abydos Temple Paper Archive
Lecture by Ayman Damarany (SCA)
Tuesday, Oct 17, 4PM
254 Barrows Hall (NES Lounge)

Narrating the modern history of Abydos from an
Egyptian perspective

The Abydos Temple Paper Archive (ATPA)
is a Berkeley affiliated project, centered on a
recently discovered historical archive containing
documents from the Egyptian Antiquities'
Service related to the heritage management of
the site of Abydos and surrounding areas, from
approximately 1850 through the 1960's. Our
focus is to preserve and categorize this historical
archive detailing the modern history of the area
and its archaeological sites from the Egyptian
point of view. Considering the many recent
projects that have investigated foreign
involvement in early Egyptian archaeology, we
believe that the Abydos Temple Paper Archive
serves as an important counterpoint that can
elucidate the contributions of the many
Egyptian archaeologists that took part in early
explorations.

Ayman Damarany is an inspector for the Egyptian
Ministry of Antiquities in Abydos, as well as
the ARCE photographer in Luxor. He co-directs
the ATPA project with Jessica Kaiser and Nora
Shalaby under the faculty lead of Prof. Carol
Redmount.





Magnificent images capture the ancient and modern wonders of 1800s Egypt

Fabulous photos of Egypt from 1870-1890, too many to forward. I've included one example. To see them all, please go to the web site. Glenn

http://mashable.com/2017/10/15/zangaki-brothers-of-egypt/#WGYihTEtTaqM

European tourists and local guides climb one of the pyramids at Giza.    Image: Rijksmuseum via Europeana      --   Sent from my Linux system.

Review: 'Prince of Egypt' musical debuts in Silicon Valley


http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/10/15/review-prince-of-egypt-musical-gets-world-premiere-at-silicon-valley/

Review: 'Prince of Egypt' musical gets world premiere in Silicon Valley

Egyptian assistant (Katherine Dela Cruz) holds Ramses as Queen Tuya (Christina Sajous) introduces her son to the new addition to their family in the world premiere of *The Prince of Egypt* presented by TheatreWorks Silicon Valley. (Kevin Berne)
PUBLISHED: | UPDATED:

In the beginning, there was the DreamWorks animated movie "The Prince of Egypt" in 1998. Now almost 20 years later, TheatreWorks is presenting the dynamic world premiere of a live stage musical version of the fable, with a score by Stephen Schwartz, whose hallowed musical canon includes "Wicked," "Pippin" and "Godspell."

The Book of Exodus may not be the greatest story over told but it's certainly epic in scope. And lo, we meet Moses, living the high life as an Egyptian prince, running chariot races and planning  memorial obelisks to the pharoahs. The twist here is that Moses and his brother Ramses are very close, with shades of the unshakable bond in "Wicked." The boys run off and confide in each other whenever life feels too confusing, until destiny finally tears them apart.

The decision to humanize these mythical figures gives the story surprising nuance. Philip LaZebnik's book gives each of the brothers their own authentic voice but keeps them rooted in the ancient legend. Schwartz's score brims with soaring ballads and pounding rhythms that aren't terribly distinct, but they do convey the drama and pageantry of the events retold. There's a majesty to the 28-member-cast production directed by Scott Schwartz in its world premiere at TheatreWorks Silicon Valley in collaboration with Denmark's Fredericia Teater, that's undeniable.

The world premiere of *The Prince of Egypt* presented by TheatreWorks Silicon Valley at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, now through Nov. 5, 2017. (Kevin Berne) 

Jason Gotay paints Ramses in vivid shades of doubt and uncertainty that are unexpected. Diluckshan Jeyaratnam doesn't fare as well fleshing out Moses's motivations. He has a believably vulnerable quality but he lacks the forcefulness and authority a role like Moses demands.

As soon as Moses uncovers his roots as a lowly Jewish slave, he must turn his back on royalty and set his people free from their shackles. Ramses isn't the only one with blood on his hands here. When Ramses refuses Moses' pleas for freedom, a plague is unleashed upon the land. Only the Hebrews are spared from the carnage.

The most miraculous part of the staging is Sean Cheesman's sculptural choreography, the way the bodies of the dancers writhe and undulate to form the burning bush, a chariot led by stallions and the parting of the waters. The use of dance as a way to move the story forward and eliminate the need for elaborate sets and special effects has its own poetry.

Indeed the understated complexity of the choreography turns out to be a bit of a curse, because it's hard not to hold other aspects of the production to that standard. In the choreography, it feels as if no movement is wasted but there are quite a few songs, such as "One of Us," where the wit falls flat. Soaring ballads such as the Oscar winner "When You Believe" are intensely sentimental but also stirring.

LaZebnik's book deepens certain aspects of the story, particularly the endurance of the brotherly bond, but it also races through significant moments, such as Ramses' decision to betray Moses.

Occasionally the score and the movement mesh, such as in the memorable number by the slave girl Tzipporah (a formidable Brennyn Lark) who sings a '"Dance to the Day" that she will be free, performed while she's chained at the feet of the Pharoah. Christina Sajous also brings real gravitas to Queen Tuya.

The embrace of the darkness and ambiguity of the Bible story is one of the show's strengths, just as the moments of Hallmark-style reconciliation are its weakness. Act 2 tips toward the sugary as it builds towards the massive parting of the sea. "Prince of Egypt" is at its mightiest when it stays true to the tragic weight of this tale of gods and prophets.


 

'THE PRINCE OF EGYPT'

Music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, book by Philip LaZebnik, based on the DreamWorks Animation film, presented by TheatreWorks Silicon Valley

Through: Nov. 5

Where: Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View

Running time: 2 hours, 20 minutes, one intermission

Tickets: $40-$100; 650-463-1960, www.theatreworks.org

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Ancient Egypt: Lost Temple Of Ramses II Reveals 3,000-year-old Mysteries of God King

For a video with more slides, go to the Newsweek web page. Glenn

http://www.newsweek.com/ancient-egypt-lost-temple-ramses-ii-reveals-3000-year-old-mysteries-god-king-685603

Ancient Egypt: Lost Temple Of Ramses II Reveals 3,000-year-old Mysteries of God King

Archaeologists in Egypt have uncovered the remains of a temple devoted to Nineteenth Dynasty Pharaoh Ramses II, casting further light on the religious practices associated with the ruler who was revered in his own lifetime as a god.

The parts of the temple were uncovered by a joint Czech and Egyptian archaeological mission working at the Abusir Necropolis in Giza in the north of the country. The team also uncovered motifs devoted to the ancient Egyptian sun gods among the ruins of the structure, believed to be over 3,200-years-old.

Mohamed Megahed, deputy director of the mission, said in a statement that his team had found the temple in an area created by a natural transition between the banks of the Nile and the floodplain at Abusir.

The temple measures roughly 100 feet in width and 170 feet in length a comprised a large forecourt flanked by two identical storage buildings.

The temple measures roughly 100 feet in width and 170 feet in length a comprised a large forecourt flanked by two identical storage buildings. Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

Megahed said studies of the ruins had indicated that stone columns had lined the walls of the forecourt which had in turn been enclosed by mudbrick walls. In some places they appear to have been painted blue.

At the back of the court, the archaeologists uncovered what appeared to be a ramp or staircase leading to a raised stone chamber. The back end of the chamber was subdivided into three parallel rooms.

"The remains of this building, which constitutes the very core of the complex, were covered with huge deposits of sand and chips of stone of which many bore fragments of polychrome reliefs," Professor Mirsolave Barta, director of the Czech mission, told Egyptian state media.

Barta and his team were able to date the complex to between 1213-1279 B.C. using fragments used in the decorative scheme of the country. A relief one wall was inscribed with the different titles of King Ramses II, as well as cultic, devotional writings to the solar deities Re, Amun and Nekhbet.

"The discovery of the Ramses II temple provides unique evidence on building and religious activities of the king in Memphis area and at the same time shows the permanent status of the cult of sun god Re who was venerated in Abusir since the Fifth Dynasty and onwards to the New Kingdom," Barta explained.

Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities has sought in recent years to emphasize the extent of archaeological work still ongoing in the country. The ancient ruins in Egypt, particular to Pharaonic culture, had been a huge draw to international tourism. However in years of civil strife following the country's 2011 revolution and a string of terror attacks particularly in the country's restive Sinai peninsula, tourist numbers have dwindled.

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An oasis of pyramids in Egypt? Discover it - Egypt Independent


http://www.egyptindependent.com/oasis-pyramids-egypt-discover/

An oasis of pyramids in Egypt? Discover it



Dahshur.. Welcome to a world of magic and mystery. The natural beauty is undisturbed, an oasis undiscovered by the masses. Located on the outskirts of Greater Cairo, Dashur stretches between the three governorates of Giza, Fayoum and Beni Suef.

The lush area is an hour away from Greater Cairo, where the desert embraces palm trees, green farms and water. Dashur is a hidden secret that 95 percent of the population of Cairo does not travel to or even have information about the place.

A collection of beautiful and quaint villages in Egypt, Abusir, Dahshur, Minshat Dahshur, Lisht, Maidum, Hawara and Lahun surround Egyptian pyramids and lakes. There are about 89 pyramids in Egypt overlooking these villages, amid palm and mango farms.

I was lucky enough, last Friday, to participate in a trip to visit a number of the lesser known pyramids in Egypt. The journey was organized by an ecotourism guide.

We started the trip at 8 am from the Saqqara area. We entered the site overlooking a valley filled with palms, in several meters we saw the monuments of Pharaoh Djoser from the 3rd dynasty. The most famous monument for him is the step pyramid.

This pyramid is the oldest stone building in the world and has a statue of the Pharaoh Djoser. We were lucky to go inside the Pyramid Complex of Unas, a pyramid destroyed from the outside located on the southern side of the Saqqara pyramid. Below this pyramid is a very impressive museum.

Due to time constraints we left the pyramids and made our way to Dahshur. The air was hot, but the palm trees provided much needed shade.

We arrived at the Berket el-Malek (Dahshur lake), expecting to see the migratory birds, but found the lake was dry. The government had made a decision to dry the lake so that migratory birds can not break out in the migration season for fears of spreading the avian flu virus. The decision was made five years but is still enforced.

We were able to see the vast desert with its natural beauty, the ancient ruins of ancient history, the traditional rural villages, the ancient waterways, and the cultural traditions of the indigenous people.

■ Dahshur the hunting grounds of King Farouk

The chief inspector of the region's antiquities, Ramadan al-Qott, told us that King Farouk, the late King of Egypt and Sudan, accompanied by some of his entourage, would travel every year, especially in March,  to this magical spot for hunting trips. The lakes attracted a variety of migratory birds on their seasonal journey, coming from Europe and the Mediterranean countries.

Qott said that the elite of Egypt at that time would also organize hunting trips to the exotic area and enjoy the sun, especially from mid April until the end of March. Artists and writers, such as Mohamed Hassanein Heikal and Tawfiq al-Hakim, were also fans of spending leisure time in the area.

■ New initiative to revive Dahshur

Qott said that Dahshur is now famous for its archeological sites, the Red Pyramid and the Bent Pyramid (built by King Sneferu) and the Black Pyramid (built by King Amenemhat III), still Dahshur's nature and cultural heritage remain hidden. Dahshur has been out of sight for years.

Many members of the local community still retain their old customs and live in a traditional way. Most Dahshur residents live on agriculture, especially palm and mango cultivation.

Qott says that this region has the largest factories and schools for hand-made carpets in Egypt and the region. The products are the best and the most expensive, because they are not just carpets but pieces of art. Dahshur consists of five villages and cab easily be reached by car through the Mariouteya road.

■ Lunch under palm and mango trees

In the afternoon, we were invited to lunch, amidst farms, gardens and the rural lands. The dishes varied between local pies, cheese and honey. We ate under the palm trees, which sprinkled dates on us while we sat. The residents gave us wonderful traditional dishes for dinner.

In the evening, we tried to get to the magnificent Maidum Pyramids before it closed at 4 pm. Maidum is the first building built by Sneferu after he ascended the throne in Egypt.

He chose a place to build it near his government headquarters, which is now near Maidum. We left with the sun dwindling behind the great building. There was not time left to visit the pyramids of Hawara and Lahun, they would have to wait for another tour another day.

Edited Translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm

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Czech excavation uncovers temple of King Ramses II in Abusir - Egypt Independent


http://www.egyptindependent.com/czech-excavation-uncovers-temple-king-ramses-ii-abusir/

Czech excavation uncovers temple of King Ramses II in Abusir



An Egyptian-Czech archaeological team uncovered the ruins of King Ramses II Temple during an excavation carried out by the mission at Abusir archaeological site, a statement for Antiquities Ministry said Sunday.

Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa Waziri, said that the discovery comes after the mission found archaeological evidence in 2012 that shows the existence of a temple in this area, a fact that encouraged the mission to resume its work in the area and the neighborhood for the last four years.

Deputy Head of the mission, Mohamed Megahed, said that the temple stretches over 2632 meters and consists of a mud brick foundation for one of its pylons, a large forecourt that leads to the hypostyle hall, which parts of are painted blue.

At the rear end of the court, the mission found a staircase or a ramp leading to a sanctuary whose back part is divided into three parallel chambers. The remains of this building were covered by huge deposits of sand and chips of stones which may bore fragments of polychrome reliefs.

Miroslav Barta, The head of the Czech mission explained that the different titles of King Ramses II were found engraved on a relief fragment connected to the cult of the solar deities. In addition, relief fragments depicting scenes of the solar gods Amun, Ra and Nekhbet were discovered.

Barta said that this temple is the only evidence of the King Ramses II presence in Memphis necropolis and confirms the continued worship of the sun god Ra in the region of Abusir, which began in the 5th dynasty and continued until the era of the New Kingdom.

 

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Parts of a Ramses II temple uncovered in Giza's Abusir - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online


http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/278833/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Parts-of-a-Ramses-II-temple-uncovered-in-Gizas-Abu.aspx

Parts of a Ramses II temple uncovered in Giza's Abusir

The newly uncovered temple in Abusir necropolis helps piece together the activities of Ramses II in the Memphis area

Nevine El-Aref , Sunday 15 Oct 2017

Cartouche of Ramesse II. Courtesy of the Czech Institute of Egyptology
Parts of a temple to King Ramses II (1213-1279 BC), along with reliefs of solar deities, have been uncovered by an Egyptian-Czech mission during excavation work in Abusir necropolis in the the governorate ofGiza

Mohamed Megahed, deputy to the mission director, told Ahram Online that the temple is located in an area that forms a natural transition between a terrace of the Nile and the floodplain in Abusir.

He added that the temple is 32 by 52 metres and behind it was a large forecourt along with two identical and considerably long storage buildings to the right and left side of the complex.

Studies carried out so far, Megahed explained, show that it can be assumed that stone columns lined the side walls of the court, which was enclosed by mud brick walls that were in at least some places painted blue.

The rear end of the court, a ramp or staircase leads to an elevated stone sanctuary whose back part was divided into three parallel chambers.

"The remains of this building, which constitutes the very core of the complex, were covered with huge deposits of sand and chips of stone of which many bore fragments of polychrome reliefs," Professor Mirsolave Barta, director of the Czech mission, told Ahram Online.

He pointed out that the fragments not only show the decorative scheme of the sanctuary, but also function to help date the entire complex.

A relief on which is engraved the different titles of King Ramses II was also found, as well as another connected to the cult of solar deities such as Re, Amun and Nekhbet.

"The discovery of the Ramses II temple provides unique evidence on building and religious activities of the king in Memphis area and at the same time shows the permanent status of the cult of sun god Re who was venerated in Abusir since the 5th Dynasty and onwards to the New Kingdom," Barta asserted.

2 View of the entrance pylon of the temple with Abusir pyramids on the horizon. Courtesy of the Czech Institute of Egyptology

View of the temple looking south. Courtesy of the Czech Institute of Egyptology

 

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Saturday, October 14, 2017

Brooklyn Museum: In ancient Egypt, baboons were sacred to the god Thoth ...


http://brooklynmuseum.tumblr.com/post/166184388435/in-ancient-egypt-baboons-were-sacred-to-the-god
On 10/08/2017 10:00 AM, Brooklyn Museum wrote:
In ancient Egypt, baboons were sacred to the god Thoth, the god...





In ancient Egypt, baboons were sacred to the god Thoth, the god of wisdom and knowledge and were believed to be able to communicate with the gods. Donating a baboon's mummy—like the one this appliqué (top) once adorned—carried your hopes and prayers, especially for wisdom in uncertain times, to the gods in the hopes that they would be answered.

Come share your hopes with the baboons in Soulful Creatures! 

Posted by Elizabeth Treptow
Baboon Appliqué, 305–30 B.C.E. Linen. Cynocephalus Baboon, 664–332 B.C.E. Bronze. Seated Baboon, ca. 1539–1075 B.C.E, or 664–332B C.E. Wood. Brooklyn Museum



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Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt – Freer|Sackler


https://www.freersackler.si.edu/exhibition/divine-felines-cats-of-ancient-egypt/

Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt

October 14, 2017–January 15, 2018
Galleries 23 & 24

Cats' personalities have made them Internet stars today. In ancient Egypt, cats were associated with divinities, as revealed in Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt. Cat coffins and representations of the cat-headed goddess Bastet are among the extraordinary objects that reveal felines' critical role in ancient Egyptian religious, social, and political life. Dating from the Middle Kingdom to the Byzantine period, the nearly seventy works include statues, amulets, and other luxury items decorated with feline features, which enjoyed special status among Egyptians. The exhibition, organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, also dedicates a small section to cats' canine counterparts.

This exhibition is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and generously supported by Jacqueline Badger Mars and Mars Petcare.

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Egypt Centre, Swansea: The Amduat in the Egypt Centre


http://egyptcentre.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-amduat-in-egypt-centre.html
On 10/12/2017 08:12 AM, Carolyn Graves-Brown wrote:
The Amduat in the Egypt Centre

The Amduat in the Egypt Centre

Inspired by Kasia Szpakowska's talk for the Friends of the Egypt Centre last night, I thought I would introduce one or two artefacts in the Egypt Centre which may have Amduat influences. Kasia's talk was all about the Amduat, the ancient Egyptian afterlife book which shows the journey of the sun-god Re through the afterlife of the Duat. The earliest complete depiction known is from the tomb of Tuthmosis III (1479-1425 BC). 

Unfortunately, we don't have any pure Amduat scenes in the Centre but during the Third Intermediate Period (1069-747 BC), Amduat scenes influenced the afterlife scenes shown in tombs, coffins and papyri. We do have some coffin fragments and a complete, coffin with Amduat influence.

So, here we have W648: It shows the sun-disk in the morning embracing the scarab. Very similar scenes are shown on New Kingdom copies of the Book of the Dead Spell 15, but there a female figure usually embraces the sun-disk. By the Third Intermediate Period, it is the male god Osiris with elements of Shu from the Book of Caverns who does the embracing. And, by this date, Osiris is more closely linked with the scarab. In Amduate texts it seems that Shu is the god who reaches towards the scarab.


And here is EC1053: a piece of cartonnage showing Re in his night boat (you can see the stars), waiting to be reborn. He is shown as a child in a red uterine disk. It isn't entirely Amduat but does echo the idea of Re travelling through the Duat to be reborn,

Here is my favourite character from the complete Third Intermediate Period coffin in the Egypt Centre showing 
Hepet-hor, She Who Embraces Horus. This divinity is almost inseparable from Osiris, guarding his judgement hall. She also tends to appear where Osiris and Re 'get together' in order to renew Re. She does appear on an Amduat Papyrus in the Nelson Atkin Museum of Art, Kansas City, where she holds up Osiris.



Then there is the mound scene on our coffin, not unlike the Amduat mound of Sokar with the snake and rebirth connotations. And, Sokar was very much associated with Osiris. 




While these examples are not entirely Amduat inspired, and several also have Book of the Dead or other Otherworld book influence, they also have some similarities with the Amduat

Any mis-attributions, mistakes etc. are of course mine, not Kasia's!






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